Monday, 3 December 2012

5 HOURS ENERGY DRINKS SIDE EFFECTS

 5-Hour Energy Drinks Cited in 13 Deaths

The federal government and the New York Attorney General's office are investigating after the Food and Drug Administration received claims that the drink 5-Hour Energy may have led to 13 deaths and 33 hospitalizations over the past four years.
The popular energy shot – which comes in 2 oz. packages and packs a powerful caffeine punch, equal to two cups of coffee -- led the way in this new and growing energy drink segment over the past eight years. Now government officials are investigating whether the product, made by Michigan-based Living Essentials, does much more.
"If someone is to use multiple cans, now is when we start to see some of the side effects," Dr. Sean Patrick Nord, USC Director of the Section of Toxicology, told ABC News. "You're getting astronomical amounts, 30 to 40 cups of coffee."

                                                                                
The recent FDA filings mark the second time in a month the administration has confirmed it is investigating claims that energy drinks are causing fatal reactions. In October, Monster energy, another popular drink that contains even more caffeine, was allegedly linked to five deaths.
The manufacturers point out that these are just claims, and there is no proven link between the drinks and the deaths.
In a statement overnight, 5-hour Energy said the product is "intended for busy adults." The company says its compact product contains "about as much caffeine as a cup of the leading premium coffee."
During an interview this September, Manoj Bhargava, the founder and CEO of 5-Hour Energy, told ABC News "Nightline" that when used as directed, the caffeine in his product doesn't do any harm.
"It's overblown. When it's in small quantities … It's like this -- water is good, but if you have too much you drown," he said.
Most experts say the fatal dose of caffeine for an adult would be almost impossible to drink – actually 50 to 60 times of what is contained in an energy drink. But critics worry about children with underlying heart problems drinking them, and are warning that energy drinks may be more hazardous than coffee because of the temperature.




5 Hour Energy Nutritional Facts

Apr 22, 2011 | By Dan Harriman
The energy drink 5-hour Energy has a formula designed to help you stay energized. Through a blend of ingredients, the drink aims to raise your energy and alertness levels without causing any jitters -- a side effect commonly associated with energy drinks. While 5-hour Energy promises to help you get through the day without feeling fatigued, researchers at the Mayo Clinic question the drink's effectiveness and nutritional value, and worry that its ingredients can cause side effects in the liver or kidneys.
Products

Living Essentials, makers of 5-hour Energy, offers seven varieties of the energy drink, including pomegranate, grape, berry, lemon, orange, decaf and extra strength. The drinks are marketed toward a busy, hard-working audience who need extra energy to get through the day without feeling tired or sluggish. Every 5-hour Energy variety comes in a 1.93 fluid ounce bottle that contains four calories and no sugar. The decaf and extra strength varieties have a formula that differs from the original formula.
Ingredients

Ingredients in the original formula products include 30 mg of niacin, 40 mg of vitamin B-6, 400 mcg of folic acid, 500 mcg of vitamin B-12, 18 g of sodium, and an energy blend that contains taurine, glucuronic acid, malic acid, N-Acetyl, L-Tyrosine, L-Phenylalanine, caffeine and citicoline. The daily value percentages for the B vitamins, niacin and folic acid are extremely high, ranging from 100 percent to 2,000 percent, but are not considered to be at a toxic level, a Mayo Clinic expert told CNN. No nutritional values exist for the energy blend in 5-hour energy, but there is approximately as much caffeine in one 5-hour Energy shot as there is one cup of coffee.
Other Ingredients

Other ingredients in one 5-hour Energy shot that do not play a factor in the drink's energizing effects include purified water, natural and artificial flavors, sucralose, potassium sorbate, sodium benzonate and EDTA, or Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, to help keep the product fresh. The decaf variety does not contain any niacin, while the extra strength variety contains 40 mg of niacin
Usage

If you try a 5-hour Energy shot for the first time, drink only half of the bottle to gauge your body's reaction. A potential side effect is a "niacin flush" reaction from the high vitamin B-3 amount. A niacin flush can consist of a hot, prickly feeling on the skin and skin redness. The reaction should last only a few minutes, according to Living Essentials. The 5-hour Energy website warns to not take the energy drink if you are pregnant or nursing, or under the age of 12. You should speak to your doctor before drinking 5-hour Energy if you are taking medication or have a medical condition.
References

    CNN.com; Small Drinks Promise Big Energy, but Experts Say Effects Unclear; Danielle Dellorto; July 2009
    5-hour Energy: How to Use 5-Hour Energy Shots
    5-hour Energy: 5-Hour Energy Ingredients & Safety

Article reviewed by GlennK Last updated on: Apr 22, 2011




Is 5-hour Energy safe in Pregnancy?

A sharp-eyed BuckMD reader read our original post on 5-Hour Energy and sent us the following note:
If 5-Hour Energy drinks are no more harmful than coffee, what are the risks of drinking less than a bottle daily during pregnancy?  I have read your site and found nothing specific on risks/side effects during pregnancy.  Are there any risks to the baby?
Good question.  The short answer comes straight from the horse's mouth.  From the 5-Hour Energy website:
Who should not take 5-hour ENERGY®?
  • Women who are pregnant or nursing.
  • Children under 12 years of age.
  • People diagnosed with phenylketonuria (PKU)
So even though (or more accurately, because) the 5-Hour Energy folks have never had to concern themselves with ensuring that any of the ingredients in their product are safe or actually do anything, they draw the line at selling it to people who are pregnant. 

Like we said in our last post, despite 5-Hour Energy's promotion of its B Vitamins and medical-yet-natural sounding "energy blend," the only thing in it that has ever been proven to improve mental alertness is caffeine.  So the question really is, "is caffeine safe in pregnancy?"  And the answer to that question is... maybe.
Some studies have reported an association between caffeine intake and adverse pregnancy outcomes while others haven't.  These studies are inconsistent because it's very difficult to control for all the factors that affect a pregnancy, not to mention accurately measure how much caffeine research participants really consumed.  The best we can say is that women who are pregnant or trying to become so should probably limit caffeine consumption to less than 200 to 300 mg per day to reduce their risk of possible adverse reproductive effects
The problem is that because 5-Hour Energy is sold as a supplement and not a medication, the company is not required to disclose their products' caffeine content.  All it says on its website is that it "contains about as much caffeine as a cup of premium coffee."  So what does that mean?  According to Energy Fiend, a 12oz Starbucks coffee has 260mg of caffeine while a 10oz Tim Horton's coffee has 100mg.  So sometimes a cup is more than a cup.
What about the excess of B Vitamins in 5-Hour Energy?  Are they safe in pregnancy?
A can of 5-Hour Energy contains 30mg of B3 (Niacin), 40mg of B6 and 500mcg of B12.  The recommended daily allowance of these vitamins in pregnancy is 18mg of B3, 1.9mg of B6 and 2.6mcg of B12, so one can of 5-Hour Energy gives you way more than you need, especially since you're more than likely getting enough from your diet anyway.  In general, B Vitamins aren't dangerous in large amounts because they're water soluble - once your body has enough, the extra is just excreted in your urine - so other than making your pee more expensive, 5-Hour Energy is unlikely to be dangerous.  However, an excess of Vitamin B3 (Niacin) can produce an uncomfortable flushing sensation.  
When in doubt, talk to your health care provider about anything you're putting into your body when you're pregnant or nursing.  If you are a student at Ohio State and have questions about pregnancy planning or other issues related to your reproductive health, you can make an appointment with our women's services department; they are always happy to help you. 
John A. Vaughn, MD Student Health Services The Ohio State University

More Deaths, Illness Linked to Energy Drinks


By WebMD Health News Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
Nov. 16, 2012 -- The FDA has posted adverse-event reports for two more energy drinks: 40 illnesses and five deaths linked to Monster Energy, and 13 illnesses and two lasting disabilities linked to Rockstar Energy.
The new reports follow this week's revelation of FDA reports linking 92 illnesses and 13 deaths to 5-Hour Energy shots. The FDA previously said it was investigating the deaths linked to 

Monster Energy.
These adverse-event reports (AERs) are filed by patients, families, or doctors. They simply warn that the products might have harmed someone -- but they do not prove that the product caused harm. The FDA can remove a product from the market only when investigation shows that the product causes harm when used according to the product label.
"If we find a relationship between consumption of the product and harm, FDA will take appropriate action to reduce or eliminate the risk,"  FDA public information officer Shelly Burgess says.

Moreover, the reports do not offer details on any underlying medical conditions that may have led to product-related illnesses.
The reports, some dating back to 2004, are not a complete inventory of all events that product users may have suffered. Most people, and many doctors, do not know how to file these reports or do not get around to filing them. And even when a product actually causes an illness, a user or doctor may not associate the product with the illness.
The new reports detail the events suffered by users of 5-Hour, Monster, and Rockstar energy drinks. These include:

  • Deaths due to heart attack or suicide linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • A miscarriage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Convulsions, life-threatening fear, deafness, and hemorrhage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Deaths due to heart attack or loss of consciousness linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to irregular heartbeat, severe diarrhea, migraine, psychotic disorder, heart attack, and/or vomiting linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Disability from irregular heartbeat or stroke linked to Rockstar Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to psychotic disorder, increased heart rate, or loss of consciousness linked to Rockstar Energy drink
  •  
All of these reports are collected by the product manufacturers. Because they market their products as nutritional supplements, they are required to submit them to the FDA.
A recent government report documented a sharp spike in the number of people who need emergency medical care after consuming energy drinks.
Living Essentials, the maker of 5-Hour Energy, said in a statement that the company "takes reports of any potential adverse event tied to our products very seriously."
But the company maintains that its products are safe when used as directed. Rockstar and Monster Energy did not respond to interview requests by publication time.

Caffeine Levels in Energy Drinks

Caffeine is the main active ingredient in energy drinks, most of which also contain herbal supplements.
A recent test by Consumer Reports found that:
  • 5-Hour Energy contains 215 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • 5-Hour Energy Extra Strength contains 242 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Monster Energy contains 92 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Drink, Double Strength contains 80 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Shot contains 229 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
An 8-ounce cup of coffee has about 100 milligrams of caffeine, although that varies according to how the coffee is brewed. For example, Consumer Reports finds that 8 ounces of Starbucks coffee has 165 milligrams of caffeine.
According to Consumer Reports, safe limits of caffeine are up to 400 milligrams per day for healthy adults, 200 milligrams a day for pregnant women, and up to 45 or 85 milligrams per day for children, depending on weight.
High doses of caffeine can result in restlessness, nervousness, insomnia, and tremors. High doses can also trigger seizures and unstable heart rhythm.

The 5 Hour Energy Scam And The Power Of Self-Deception


“We asked over 3,000 doctors to review 5 Hour Energy, and what they said is amazing.  Over 73% who reviewed 5 Hour Energy said they would recommend a low-calorie energy supplement to their healthy patients who use energy supplements.”
The first time I saw this commercial, I had to double check to see if it was a Saturday Night Live skit.  But alas, it wasn’t.
Yes, they asked “over 3,000 doctors.”  According to the fine print, they actually asked 5,000 in person and only half of them agreed to review the drink, and by review the drink, they clarify that they agreed to read the ingredients and their associated descriptions.  An additional 503 doctors responded to an online survey, but they don’t tell us how many they asked to respond online.
73% of the docs who actually reviewed the stuff recommended a low-calorie energy supplement—not 5 Hour Energy, specifically, just a low-calorie energy supplement.  But this “recommendation” was still further qualified; they recommended the low-calorie supplement only to their healthy patients who actually use energy supplements.
What do we really learn, then, from this not-so-highly scientific study?
For those statistical anomalies who can somehow be deemed “healthy,” even though they require a regular chemical boost merely to survive the day, 73% of the doctors who didn’t blow this study off as an absurd waste of time recommend that you use an energy supplement that won’t also make you fat, accelerating your already rapid pace to an early grave.
My first inclination was to be offended that 5 Hour Energy thinks there are enough people dull enough to be manipulated by the lady with the perma-smile sitting next to a bunch of fake documents, but then it hit me—they’re not trying to get non-users to take 5 Hour Energy.  They’re trying to help existing users perpetuate their own ruse of self-deception.
Self-deception is more powerful than coercion, because we’re more inclined to believe the stories we tell ourselves (both true and untrue) than the convictions of others.  So the most effective external manipulation is that which supports what we’d already prefer to believe.  I know my body does not naturally require the daily infusion of 5 Hour Energy if I actually get enough sleep and exercise—but I’d rather not, so I’ll buy your story about the 73% of doctors.
What stories are you buying regarding your health, marriage or other relationships, work or finances that are rooted in self-deception?  And what forces may be seeking to perpetuate that self-deception?


Can Energy Drinks Damage Your Kidneys?
Aug 18, 2011 | By Joe King, M.S.
Energy drinks are any beverage that is promoted to increase energy, alertness or athletic performance. While some of the ingredients in most energy drinks may indeed increase your energy levels, these same ingredients can also be harmful to your kidneys, especially if you are consuming them in large quantities. The main energy-producing ingredients in many energy drinks are taurine, caffeine and sugar. Talk to your doctor about energy drinks and these ingredients before drinking them, especially if you suffer from weak or damaged kidneys.


Taurine

Taurine is an amino acid found in high quantities naturally throughout your body and is needed for many different bodily functions. Taurine is often included in energy drinks due to its potential energy-producing effect, even though there is limited scientific evidence to support this rationale, according to a 2002 study published in the "Oxford Journal of Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation." In this study, researchers found that taurine in energy drinks can accelerate kidney damage in patients who suffer from kidney disease.


Caffeine

Caffeine is the most widely used ingredient in the majority of energy drinks because it has been scientifically shown to stimulate energy and increase mental alertness and athletic performance, according to the book, " Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements." Energy drinks can cause a caffeine overdose because some energy drinks may contain as much as three times the amount of caffeine found in soda, according to an article in "The Clinical Advisor." Long-term supplementation with caffeine can cause kidney damage and renal system failure.


Sugar

Sugar, usually in the form of dextrose, is one of the primary ingredients of many energy drinks. A high intake of simple sugars, such as dextrose, can cause wild swings in your blood sugar levels. This not only places stress on your pancreas, which produces the insulin hormone, but it also places stress on your kidneys. Your kidneys are responsible for not only filtering out toxins in your blood stream, but excess water as well. Dextrose promotes water retention, which makes it difficult for your kidneys to function optimally.
Recommendations

Energy drinks should never be consumed by children or adolescents due to the potential risk of a variety of side effects, the American Academy of Pediatrics states. While the Food and Drug Administration has yet to offer any specific guidelines for energy drink consumption, MayoClinic.com states that they can be acceptable, but only when used in moderation. Always talk to your doctor first before using energy drinks to boost energy.
References


    "Essentials of Sports Nutrition and Supplements"; Jose Antonio, Douglass Kalman, Jeffrey R. Stout, and Mike Greenwood; 2008
    "Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation"; Accumulation of Taurine in Patients with Renal Failure; M.E. Suliman et al.; 2002
    "The Clinical Advisor"; Energy Drinks May Cause Caffeine Overdose, Drug Interactions; Nicole Blazek; February 2011
    Medscape Today News; AAP Guidelines Nix Energy Drinks for Children, Teens; Laurie Barclay; May 2011
    Mayo Clinic; Can Energy Drinks Really Boost a Person's Energy?; Katherine Zeratsky


Article reviewed by Jenna Marie Last updated on: Aug 18, 2011


----------------------------------
More Deaths, Illness Linked to Energy Drinks

By WebMD Health News Reviewed by Louise Chang, MD
Nov. 16, 2012 -- The FDA has posted adverse-event reports for two more energy drinks: 40 illnesses and five deaths linked to Monster Energy, and 13 illnesses and two lasting disabilities linked to Rockstar Energy.
The new reports follow this week's revelation of FDA reports linking 92 illnesses and 13 deaths to 5-Hour Energy shots. The FDA previously said it was investigating the deaths linked to 

Monster Energy.
These adverse-event reports (AERs) are filed by patients, families, or doctors. They simply warn that the products might have harmed someone -- but they do not prove that the product caused harm. The FDA can remove a product from the market only when investigation shows that the product causes harm when used according to the product label.
"If we find a relationship between consumption of the product and harm, FDA will take appropriate action to reduce or eliminate the risk,"  FDA public information officer Shelly Burgess says.


Moreover, the reports do not offer details on any underlying medical conditions that may have led to product-related illnesses.
The reports, some dating back to 2004, are not a complete inventory of all events that product users may have suffered. Most people, and many doctors, do not know how to file these reports or do not get around to filing them. And even when a product actually causes an illness, a user or doctor may not associate the product with the illness.
The new reports detail the events suffered by users of 5-Hour, Monster, and Rockstar energy drinks. These include:

  • Deaths due to heart attack or suicide linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • A miscarriage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Convulsions, life-threatening fear, deafness, and hemorrhage linked to 5-Hour Energy
  • Deaths due to heart attack or loss of consciousness linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to irregular heartbeat, severe diarrhea, migraine, psychotic disorder, heart attack, and/or vomiting linked to Monster Energy drink
  • Disability from irregular heartbeat or stroke linked to Rockstar Energy drink
  • Hospitalization due to psychotic disorder, increased heart rate, or loss of consciousness linked to Rockstar Energy drink
  •  
All of these reports are collected by the product manufacturers. Because they market their products as nutritional supplements, they are required to submit them to the FDA.
A recent government report documented a sharp spike in the number of people who need emergency medical care after consuming energy drinks.
Living Essentials, the maker of 5-Hour Energy, said in a statement that the company "takes reports of any potential adverse event tied to our products very seriously."
But the company maintains that its products are safe when used as directed. Rockstar and Monster Energy did not respond to interview requests by publication time.

Caffeine Levels in Energy Drinks

Caffeine is the main active ingredient in energy drinks, most of which also contain herbal supplements.
A recent test by Consumer Reports found that:

  • 5-Hour Energy contains 215 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • 5-Hour Energy Extra Strength contains 242 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Monster Energy contains 92 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Drink, Double Strength contains 80 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
  • Rockstar Energy Shot contains 229 milligrams of caffeine per serving.
An 8-ounce cup of coffee has about 100 milligrams of caffeine, although that varies according to how the coffee is brewed. For example, Consumer Reports finds that 8 ounces of Starbucks coffee has 165 milligrams of caffeine.
According to Consumer Reports, safe limits of caffeine are up to 400 milligrams per day for healthy adults, 200 milligrams a day for pregnant women, and up to 45 or 85 milligrams per day for children, depending on weight.
High doses of caffeine can result in restlessness, nervousness, insomnia, and tremors. High doses can also trigger seizures and unstable heart rhythm.



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4 comments:

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  2. You have obviously never researched any of this properly. Caffeine is perfectly safe under 400mg's a day except in pregnant women who should not have any caffeine or stimulants. Even with doses over 400 it is still relatively safe. Also a suicide was linked to 5 hour energy? That is absolutely ridiculous there is no scientific evidence that relates the ingredients of 5 hour energy to any kind of depression or suicidal thoughts unless they took with some kind amphetamine or psychedelic drug.

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